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October 5, 2019 – April 12, 2020

Time may have eroded the memory of a civilization but not the mystery of what was. Long ago, two bustling cities in ancient Egypt were known throughout the world as cultural centers of power, of wealth, of trade, and novel artistry. One day as the Mediterranean sun beat down on the bay of Aboukir, the cities slipped into the sea without a whisper of wind, buried for centuries.

Statue of the God Hapy

Statue of the God Hapy

(SCA 281) Maritime Museum, Alexandria – IEASM excavations

Photo Christoph Gerigk ©Franck Goddio/Hilti Foundation

Statue of a Ptolemaic Queen

Statue of a Ptolemaic Queen

(SCA 280) Maritime Museum, Alexandria – IEASM excavations

Photo Christoph Gerigk ©Franck Goddio/Hilti Foundation

Statue of a Ptolemaic King

Statue of a Ptolemaic King

(SCA 279) Maritime Museum, Alexandria – IEASM excavations

Photo Christoph Gerigk ©Franck Goddio/Hilti Foundation

The Stele of Thonis-Heracleion
(SCA 277) National Museum of Alexandria – IEASM excavations

Photo Christoph Gerigk ©Franck Goddio/Hilti Foundation

An Osiris-Canopus
(SCA 205) National Museum of Alexandria – IEASM excavations

Photo Christoph Gerigk ©Franck Goddio/Hilti Foundation

Who wouldn’t dream of unearthing lost antiquities from a forgotten civilization, sunken into obscurity? Determined to recover the cities that vanished, Franck Goddio, a mathematician by trade and underwater archeologist at heart, delivered the discovery of a millennium for he located not a shipwreck but an entire civilization.

Statue of the Bull God Apis

Statue of the Bull God Apis
(SCA 351) Graeco-Roman Museum, Alexandria – IEASM excavations

Photo Christoph Gerigk ©Franck Goddio/Hilti Foundation

This story will be told in Egypt’s Lost Cities at the Ronald Reagan Presidential Library and Museum, where more than 200 of these authentic artifacts, including three colossal 16-foot sculptures of a pharaoh, a queen, and a god will be on view.

Statue of a priest holding an Osiris-Canopus in his veiled hands surrounded by two sphinxes found together in the harbour Alexandria

(SCA 451, 449, 450) National Museum of Alexandria – IEASM excavations

Photo Christoph Gerigk ©Franck Goddio/Hilti Foundation

Other objects on display include precious gold coins and jewelry, bronze vessels, objects inscribed in the ancient Egyptian or Greek languages, and statues from the sunken and forgotten ancient cities of Thonis-Heracleion and Canopus. The artifacts will be seen alongside ancient Egyptian artifacts from museums in Cairo and Alexandria.

Don’t miss this epic story of their discovery.

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PARENTAL WARNING:

Although this exhibition is appropriate for people of all ages – and includes great history lessons for children – it’s important to remember that these statues and sculptures were created over 1,200 years ago in Egypt.  As such, a few of the sculptures feature era-specific depictions of men and women without clothing, or with very limited clothing.  

Photographs Christoph Gerigk and Jérôme Delafosse ©Franck Goddio/Hilti Foundation

Organised with the Institut Européen d’Archéologie Sous-Marine with the generous support of the Hilti Foundation and in collaboration with the Ministry of Antiquities of the Arab Republic of Egypt

HILTI IEASM

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